S&A Magazine Issue 7 – Volume 2

November 2021 Issue

Issue 7 – Volume 2

Table of Contents
  • Holiday of the Month
  • Sketchbook Page
  • Quote of the Month
  • Craft
  • Drawing Prompt
  • Sustainable Fashion
  • Main Article
  • Recipe

Holiday of the Month

Diwali

Lamps fill the night with gentle drops of light. Fireworks soar up and explode in the sky, bursting in every direction with streaks of color. Children laugh and smile, showing each other their new clothes. The aroma of delicious food travels around, lingering in every room of colorfully decorated homes. Families get together to pray for good luck and health. All of this because it is Diwali!

Diwali, Deepavali, or the Festival of Lights is a major Hindu holiday. It is celebrated mainly in India, but it is also popular in Nepal, Malaysia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and the United States. With all of the different people who celebrate the holiday, traditions and history of Diwali vary. However, the holiday is believed to have started around 2,500 years ago. Across towns, states, and counties, the holiday evolved. 

Different Regions and Traditions

South India

Different regions have their own beliefs and traditions around Diwali. In the south, the holiday is actually called Deepavali. The root word Deepa means light and the whole word means row of lights. The story behind Deepavali is generally believed to be about the god Krishna defeating a demon named Narakasura. When Lord Krishna came back to his town, his victory was celebrated with lights and togetherness. The use of lights represents good over evil. In South Indian homes, families wake up early and apply oil on their head and skin and wash it off (an oil bath). Then, they prepare and eat an assortment of different foods. Children light sparklers and get together to celebrate the holiday.

North India

In North India, Diwali is associated with a story in the ancient Ramayana. When Rama returns to his kingdom after 14 years of exile. The day was celebrated with lights and other festivities. Similarly to its southern counterpart, the North believes that Diwali is a holiday celebrating good over evil. Families in North India celebrate Diwali for 5 days. The celebration starts with offering gifts to the goddess Lakshmi. The rest of the days are left to parties, lighting lamps, praying, buying new clothes, and just having fun!

United States

One way that people celebrate Diwali in the United States is to cook a traditional meal and invite friends over. This is a good way to socialize and eat delicious food! Another way that people in the US celebrate Diwali is by hosting a party. Parties include dancing, fireworks, and food. Many people use fireworks on Diwali because they are said to represent the victory of light over evil but many people just use fireworks as a way to show festivity. Lastly, some people celebrate this holiday by going to a Hindu temple. Families get together to pray for a happy and healthy life and for the darkness to wash away.

Conclusion

Diwali is a major holiday celebrated in many different places, times, and ways. No matter how – or even if you do not – celebrate, we hope you have a great Diwali full of light and fun!


Sketchbook Page

Mixed Media Illustration

For this month’s sketchbook page, I decided to experiment with a variety of mediums. The mediums I used include watercolor, pastel, colored pencil, ink, and collage. I chose bold and vibrant colors for the background, making the blue and orange hues in the illustration pop out.


Quote of the Month

November Quote

This month’s quote is, “You are imperfect, permanently and inevitably flawed. And you’re beautiful.” I thought this quote was a very powerful one because beauty was put into perspective in a very concise way. It’s true – we are not perfect! We all have our flaws, flaws that make us human. It’s important to remember that our imperfections, in a way, are what make us beautiful.


Craft

DIY Terrarium

This month’s craft is a simple terrarium made from everyday materials. Plus, this terrarium is easy to maintain. Acting as a cute decoration or just a way to add plants to your space, this craft is sure to brighten your day!

Pictured Above: Some of the supplies you may need for this craft

What You’ll Need

  • Glass jar
  • Fairy lights
  • Moss, cactus, or other small plants
  • Soil
  • Pebbles
  • Any other decorative materials

Directions

  1. Add a layer of stones or pebbles to the bottom of your glass jar.
  2. Fill the rest of the jar about three quarters of the way to the top with soil.
  3. Carefully plant the moss, cacti, & other plants
  4. Glue or tape the fairy lights to the lid of the jar. (This creates an effect that makes your terrarium look like it is glowing)
  5. Add any other final touches
  6. To water your plants, use a spray bottle or mister. Keep your terrarium in a place with sunlight and a moderate temperature. (Ideally Indoors)

Drawing Prompt

Draw a Look Inspired by a Music Video

For this month’s drawing prompt, I decided to draw a look from the music video for Don’t Go Yet. I chose to draw something from this video because it has a distinct and colorful aesthetic that I thought would be fun to emulate. I was inspired by the outfits, hair and makeup, colors, and vintage patterns used throughout the video. You can draw a picture from any music video you like and send it to us at sandazine@gmail.com!


Sustainable Fashion

An Outfit Styled With Saye

Saye is a sustainable fashion brand who makes vegan sneakers that aren’t just sustainable, but also fashionable. Plus, for every pair of sneakers purchased, two trees are planted. So far, Saye has planted over 178,238 trees in areas in need of them!

Modelo ’89 Vegan Cactus Sneakers – $192


Main Article

Connecting to Nature

Introduction

In a time of industrialism and consumerism, it is more important than ever to connect to nature. Nature is everywhere. Whether it’s a single park in the middle of a city or a forest with no inhabitants for miles, research has shown that being exposed to nature improves one’s health–both mentally and physically along with improving your well-being. 

Why We Need Nature

The word “nature” comes from the Latin word “natura”, which in ancient times meant “birth”. Every organism on this planet relies on nature to survive. Getting rid of this basic need will lead to the extinction of many species along with the collapse of ecosystems. At least half of the world’s oxygen comes from the oceans. While oceans are a major source of oxygen, plants and trees also provide oxygen. Another reason why we need nature is that nature provides food, water, and shelter–everything a human needs to survive on Earth

To forget how to dig the earth and to tend the soil is to forget ourselves.


—Mahatma Gandhi

Easy Ways to Connect to Nature

  1. Visit a local park or arboretum 

There are parks in practically every town or city and parks are a great place to study or get work done because of the calm environment. You can find parks near you with this Local Park Finder.

  1. Explore a neighborhood near you

Whether you live in a city, in the suburbs, or somewhere remote, there’s probably a place near you where you can walk around or explore. This could be a neighborhood or something as simple as a road you’ve never walked on. 

  1. Take a hike

Take a walk in a nearby forest! This is good exercise, plus you get to be in nature. If there aren’t any forests near you, try to explore your area or find a Nature Preserve. Here is a map of forests you can hike in.

  1. Start a garden 

This sounds fairly simple, but unfortunately, many people don’t have their own garden or are unable to maintain one due to where they live. Despite this, you can still join a community garden. Community gardens usually donate the food or flowers they grow and also serve as a great way to get to know people in your area! If you are starting your own garden, it can be helpful to research what you are going to plant and what plants grow best in your area.

  1. Go bird-watching

This is a great activity to do with kids and you don’t even need binoculars! All you have to do is look for birds while you are on a walk! Try to pay attention to each bird’s unique features. What do its feathers look like? Does the bird have anything distinct about it?

Conclusion

In conclusion, getting out in nature is very important and can be beneficial to your health. Why spend all your time inside when you can enjoy the world around you?


Recipe

Vegan Lasagna

I love lasagna. It’s such a classic, comforting dish. I originally got this recipe from Cookie and Kate’s Vegetable Lasagna, but as my family’s diet changed, so did the recipe! While it may be different from a traditional lasagna, it’s one I’ve made for my family many times! You can try this recipe out and send us a picture to sandazine@gmail.com!

Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

Serves: 8

Ingredients

Vegetables

  • 1 zucchini
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 bell pepper
  • 1 bunch of baby spinach
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • dash of salt
  • dash of pepper
  • dash of cayenne pepper

Vegan “Ricotta”

  • 16 oz block of firm tofu (You can also use silken)
  • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • Dash of Italian seasoning

Other Ingredients

  • Jar of marinara sauce
  • 9 oven ready lasagna sheets
  • Vegan mozzarella shreds (optional)

Directions

  1. Prep your veggies by chopping them up
  2. Heat up the oil and add in the minced garlic
  3. Then, add in the chopped zucchini, carrot, and bell pepper and cook for a few minutes
  4. Add the spinach and season your veggies
  5. For the “ricotta,” blend the tofu and add in your seasonings
  6. Add the cooled veggies into your “ricotta” and mix
  7. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F
  8. Now, start to assemble the lasagna. Start by spooning a layer of sauce, then lasagna sheets, more sauce, filling, more sauce, and then vegan mozzarella shreds. Continue layering ingredients in this order. (I add sauce between each layer to keep the lasagna from drying out in the oven.)
  9. Bake in the oven for 30 minutes
  10. Let cool and Enjoy!

Thanks for reading S&A Magazine!

Questions or Comments? Email them to sandazine@gmail.com or fill out the contact form on our website! We’d love to hear your feedback!